For today’s session of the math circle I jointly run for 5-7 year-olds, we got the kids to play with Lindenmayer Systems (L-Systems for short). L-Systems can be used as compact representations of complex geometric shapes, including fractals. The aim of the session was for children to understand that simple formulae can describe complex geometric objects, building on the intuition that properties of shapes can be described algebraically that we got through a previous session on symmetry and algebra.

I stumbled across this excellent L-System generator on the web, which was perfect for our needs as we didn’t need to install any software on the school laptops. After illustrating how the Koch Snowflake could be generated, we simply let them loose to experiment, suggesting that each time they set the number of iterations to 1 before exploring a greater depth of iteration. They seemed to really enjoy it. On a one-to-one basis, we discussed the reason that various formulae generated their corresponding shapes, trying to embed the link between the equations and the graphical representation, but the main emphasis was generating visually pleasing images.

Here are some of the curves they produced. In each case, the caption is of the form: number of iterations, angle, axiom, production rule.

I would have liked to have the time to discuss in more depth why the curve that appeared to fill the triangle had no white space visible.

Once we had finished, we finally drew together where I presented a simple L-System for the Sierpinski Triangle, an object they’d seen before in a previous session. There were several exclamations of awe, which are always great to hear!

Advertisements